In a Landscape

 

7 - 19 June 2016
10 am - 5 pm Monday - Saturday, 11 am - 4 pm Sunday

Opening View: Tuesday 7 June, 6.30 - 8.30 pm

 


Lin Cudlipp

Sue Williams

Ysabel Winzar

Denise Orchard

Sandra Litchfield

Maggie Smith


Hazel Strange

In his book The Old Ways, Robert Macfarlane refers to Landscape as “a noun connoting fixity, scenery, an immobile painterly decorum”.
The accompanying footnote says, 'Landscape is a late 16th C Anglicization of the Dutch word Landschap which had originally meant a ”unit or tract of land” but which during the 1500s has become so strongly associated with the Dutch school of landscape painting that at the point of its Anglicization its primary meaning was “a painterly depiction of scenery”: it was not used to mean physical landscape until 1725.’
This is an interesting piece of art history, about the relationship between “Landscape” and painting, which continues from the 1500s through the centuries to current day artists including Kurt Jackson and his large scale canvases and Richard Long’s walks and interventions.
An important part of my painting is the walking through the landscape to arrive at the viewpoint. Rarely is this reached by stepping out of the car and pointing my camera. During the walking I’m considering how other people have travelled the route: on foot, on horseback or laden with contraband. We rarely see evidence of their journeys. And finally, arriving, I stand and marvel at the scene, the fields, beaches, cliffs, all changing over time: perhaps slowly, over many years, or more rapidly with the seasons and their differing crops, perhaps more dramatically with a cliff fall during a storm. And then I look at the sea, which changes by the hour with the tide, or the wind whipping up foam; or by the minute, the colour affected by the blue sky, or grey clouds passing rapidly across.
Chambers 20th Century Dictionary now defines Landscape as “The appearance of that portion of land which the eye can view at once...”
For me, this modern definition is a little problematical. I describe myself as painting “semi-abstract landscapes” and yet my diptych paintings are the view from a high point, seen as you turn and look at the expanse, two or three eyesful at least. In working towards this exhibition I’ve become obsessed with the traces left by recent visitors – a plastic duck on a beach, a dropped glove, and some will be in evidence alongside my more recognisable paintings.
Hazel Strange

" Working with pewter, copper, wood and found objects, I have been looking closely at the landscape that lies under our feet, or hidden away from public gaze. It amazes me what interesting views we miss as we walk past."
Sandra Litchfield

Ysabel Winzar's work refers to "the stuff of my life". Ysabel explains that her response to a subject can take on a different meaning when looked at in the context of a well-loved poem, such as a few lines by Louis MacNeice : "The sunlight on the garden hardens and grows cold, one can not cage the minute within its nets of gold". When developed into an image in a painting or printmaking the subject can take on another life, captured in time when painted, and then another by the viewer.
“A crop of pears heading for the kitchen may have to wait a while to have their portrait painted before they are dispatched to a pickle jar, and the inspiration for this painting came while I was reading a well-loved cookery book. Pears are a lovely subject to paint with their rounded, fleshy shape and subtle colouring. I like the idea that the pear at the back might be thinking about trying to escape!”

Primarily a print-maker, I enjoy developing work with other artists from other disciplines. Waterways, initially made for our industrial landscape and the movement of people, are now tourist attractions. In 2015, while walking by a river, I saw a wooden bench with the word ‘Riverside’ carved in large letters. I had to return with wax crayons and fine paper to make wax rubbings of those letters. The crumpled sheets of paper now hang in my studio, shouting out at me to say something, make something, to tell a story and to connect with the waterside.
When Antony Gormley was talking about his recent project, ‘Land’, for the Landmark Trust he said, “water means you can leave home… go to places you would not normally go… We are drawn to canals… it is a captured water.”
I am exploring the use of various metals to link with the industrial use of waterways. I am etching metals and adding extra textural layers. My exhibition work will be the metal pieces and images made from the metal plates.
Sue Williams

Inspired by the sublime beauty of the landscape, I feel connected to the land. It pulls at me somewhere deep inside on a primitive, visceral level. Extremes of weather, rugged land, water and the elusive light drive me to paint, to create and to express myself. My work is based on observation, sketches, ink drawings and videos en plein air. I return to my studio for time to reflect. The act of painting takes over, and subconsciously I am clinging to memory, light, colour, movement. I use hands, cloth, knife and any mark making tool to capture the essence of place and commit it to paint. Often I work on textured ground which I create using various mediums and fire. I have been told that my work evokes memories of place and time and initiates a connection, a visual language and an appreciation of the natural world.
As part of my working practice I seek to explore new techniques and approaches to painting. I enjoy collaborating with other artists to share ideas, knowledge and experiences. On a personal level, ‘In a Landscape’ is literally the obvious: the location where my work begins. However, this evolves and becomes an emotional, intuitive and often even subconscious response influenced by many things: the feel of a place, a piece of music, a pebble. As a result of a visit to an exhibition focused on ‘Place’ I took time to consider ‘My Place’. The ocean, which has long been my muse, spiritual refuge and comfort. In my sketchbooks you will find poems I have written, inspired by the ocean. I walk the strandlines and rockpools often, observing and collecting, and found objects feature in my collages. In my collections you will see evidence of my current obsession with minutiae. I am fascinated by the diversity you can find along our shorelines, the variety of colours, shapes and sizes. We often ‘look’ but do we really ‘see’? I find landscapes on pebble faces, repeated patterns, the big and the small, so much to observe that corresponds to the wider world … the world in a grain of sand, my ‘Place’.
Lin Cudlipp

Inspiration for my work comes from my immediate surroundings, the fields near my home and walks by the sea and coastline. For this exhibition I am taking the opportunity to visit familiar and unfamiliar landscapes, working with a group outside, sharing ideas and enjoying how they influence my work patterns. I can revisit a place on many occasions and feel something new each time. I hope to interpret a sense of the place and the feeling of it in both sketchbooks and finished pieces of work.
Maggie Smith


I am currently working in oils, aiming to use paint in an expressive and lively way. My seascapes are about capturing the atmosphere, dynamic light and varying moods of the beautiful Devon and Cornwall coast. I am particularly inspired by stormy and dramatic skies.
Denise Orchard

www.hazelstrange.net
www.suewilliamsart.net
www.maggiesmithartist.co.uk
www.lincudlippartist.co.uk
www.brock-design-sw.co.uk